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Fundraising

There are so many ways to fundraise:

EVENTS

Sponsored events are very popular – walking, cycling, running, swimming, even bungee jumps or parachute jumps for the more adventurous!

Some more popular ideas are:

  • Coffee mornings and Afternoon teas
  • Wine and cheese nights
  • Opening up your garden and charging entry
  • Quiz nights
  • Treasure hunts

If your activity is sponsored don’t forget to complete  a sponsor form which gives each sponsor’s title (ie Mr/Mrs etc), first name, surname, full home address, post code, Gift Aid declaration (ie to tick a box which confirms the charity can claim gift aid on their behalf) and finally the amount of the donation.

This allows us to claim back the Gift Aid and means we  can claim back an extra 25% back from the government on every donation without it costing you a penny more.

Above all enjoy and have fun!

Some important things to think about:

Keep yourself safe – before undertaking any activity that is physically demanding, we highly recommend that you find out the level of fitness required and, if necessary, check with your GP.

Please do not undertake door to door collections. People do not like strangers knocking on their doors asking for money and you need a licence from your local authority if you intend doing any street collections.


"Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation cannot be delivered in isolation. The needs of the child have to be looked at both holistically and within the context of the family unit. Parents need to be empowered to be parents in post-acute pediatric neuro-rehabilitation following brain injury"
The Children's Trust; United Kingdom
"Rehabilitation interventions can lead to positive outcomes for children and their families if delivered in the familiar home environment and applied to everyday situations"
Cerebra; United Kingdom
"Intensive and individualized approaches work. A one-size-fits-all approach doesn't. You have to make it relevant to the child."
Recolo; United Kingdom
"When someone has a brain injury, early access to local, specialist rehabilitation is crucial to ensure the maximum recovery and make significant savings to the state in health costs"
Headway; United Kingdom
"Children and young people have poor social competence post brain injury due to reduced cognition, executive functions, and emotional control. As a result they are twice as likely to have mental health issues in the future"
James Tonks; University of London
"We are medical practitioners. The real experts are the parents. Over the last 35 years they have taught me everything I know"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"Case management for children and young people post acquired brain injury is 'pivotal' to successful outcomes and must be local"
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"Thousands of children and young people living in the UK today without the help and support that can make a huge difference to their lives"
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Parent-supported interventions following pediatric ABI bring reductions to the cost to society"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands

OUR MISSION: To work to remove health inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded