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Fact Sheets

Acquired Brain Injury

TYPE 1
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

  • Fall
  • Road Traffic Accident
  • Sporting Head Injury

TYPE 2
Non Traumatic Brain Injury (NTBI)

  • Stroke
  • Brain Tumour
  • Encephalitis
  • Meningitis
  • Drowning

We hope that, over time, this area of the website will provide a range of fact sheets to provide a range of information on issues affecting families living with the effect of an acquired brain injury.

Brain Injury: Stages of Recovery – Ranchos Scale

Hospital Discharge Planning

Deficits of an Acquired Brain Injury

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) Fact Sheet

County Durham Community Foundation Respite Grant Guidelines


"Children and young people have poor social competence post brain injury due to reduced cognition, executive functions, and emotional control. As a result they are twice as likely to have mental health issues in the future"
James Tonks; University of London
"New parenting support intervention showed how parenting style is related to executive dysfunction in children and young people post brain injury. With support parents cope better so the child has a better recovery"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain
"Different 'experts' involved in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland
"We are medical practitioners. The real experts are the parents. Over the last 35 years they have taught me everything I know"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"Case management for children and young people post acquired brain injury is 'pivotal' to successful outcomes and must be local"
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"Parent-supported interventions following pediatric ABI bring reductions to the cost to society"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Restoration of anatomical functions and relationships must be done within 2 months of brain injury"
Eyzyon Eisentein; Israel
"We need to harness the power of brain plasticity for treating children and young people with brain injury. Stressful experiences alter brain development of a child, especially at the key ages of 0-3 and at ages 10-16"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Intensive and individualized approaches work. A one-size-fits-all approach doesn't. You have to make it relevant to the child."
Recolo; United Kingdom
"Thousands of children and young people living in the UK today without the help and support that can make a huge difference to their lives"
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust

OUR MISSION: To work to remove health inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded