Font size + -

Neuro-rehabilitation

What does neuro-rehabilitation do?

‘Rehabilitation aims to reduce the impact of (brain) injury by resoration of damaged function, or compensation for lost function, within the limitations of underlying diseas, to optimise physical, cognitive, psychological and social function.’

(Seeley & Hutchinson, 2006)

What do we know?

From adult studies of traumatic brain  injury:

Better access to neuro-rehabilitation associated with better outcomes means people:

  • are more likely to be discharged home
  • have a shorter hospital stay
  • have better functional outcome which was maintained after period of rehabilitation has ended
  • decreases levels of distress of carers

Additionally, the outcome of a paediatric acquired brain injury is related to family function, economic factors and social support

Neuro-rehabilitation is most effective if:

  • It is delivered by a co-ordinated multi-disciplinary team with an interdisciplinary approach
  • There is goal setting and assessment
  • There is a key worker to communicate and provide advocacy for the child and the family
  • It is individually tailored to need
  • Is seamless
  • It is meaningful and delivered in relevant context
  • An appropriate level of therapy and support is provided
  • Access to suitable educational provision is available
  • Psychological needs are addressed
  • It involves and supports the family

 


"Different 'experts' involved in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"We would like to see earlier identification and support for children with brain injuries to help them succeed in school."
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Taking brain injured children home causes high stress for families. Disjointed services exacerbate family stress levels."
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"When someone has a brain injury, early access to local, specialist rehabilitation is crucial to ensure the maximum recovery and make significant savings to the state in health costs"
Headway; United Kingdom
"New parenting support intervention showed how parenting style is related to executive dysfunction in children and young people post brain injury. With support parents cope better so the child has a better recovery"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain
"Our 10 year study proves that family-led home-based neuro-rehab interventions deliver the best outcomes for children and young people"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"Brain development is complex and prolonged. Brain plasticity is influenced by a range of factors. Plasticity provides a base for neuro-rehab therapies and treatment"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is prove to bring health improvements; improve independence; a decline in the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"We need to harness the power of brain plasticity for treating children and young people with brain injury. Stressful experiences alter brain development of a child, especially at the key ages of 0-3 and at ages 10-16"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada

OUR MISSION: To work to remove health inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded