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We’ve gone global!

October 15th, 2015

Matrix Neurological has come a very long way since becoming a registered charity on 16 January 2015 and we are happy to share our biggest achievement to date. Our Chair was honoured to be invited to be one of the opening speakers at the worlds’ first International Paediatric Brain Injury Conference that was held in Liverpool on 16th – 18th September 2015. The conference was organised by the International Paediatric Brain Injury Society (IPBIS) and was supported by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH).

logoIPBIS

The International Paediatric Brain Injury Society is an international organisation that

“collaborates to disseminate knowledge by developing and sharing best practices, mentoring colleagues, advancing research and promoting prevention for the benefit of children, adolescents and young adults with ABI and their families.”

The Liverpool conference was the first global event that brought together all those involved in the identification, treatment and prevention of brain injury of children, adolescents, and young adults and was attended by 400 delegates and leading professionals from around the world.

The theme of the conference was Supporting Young People and Their Families to Maximise Good Outcomes and Quality of Life. The scientific aim of the event was to explore current and innovative treatments, rehabilitation programmes, support mechanisms, and ways to improve the lives and potential of these young people and their families. The conference served as a platform for the development of Guidelines for ABI in Children and Adolescents for presentation to the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations (UN) UNESCO, particularly focusing on the concept of ABI as a chronic disease process.

This event gave Matrix Neurological an international platform to promote our innovative work. Our Founder talked about her personal experiences of traumatic brain injury following her son’s climbing accident five years ago. She was also able to talk about the work of our new and innovative charity, which generated much interest and excitement from those delegates. Our website has since seen a massive increase in ‘hits’ from different countries around the world.

Some of the key messages from the keynote speakers arising from existing global best practice were the impacts of an acquired brain injury on the lives of children and young people, but even more importantly the potential for a good recovery post-injury.

Three key issues were continuously raised during the three day conference:

a) the importance of ongoing intensive neuro-rehab being essential for children and young people

b) the importance of family resilience and good parenting skills for ensuring good outcomes

c) the need to rethink how neuro-rehab services are provided for children and young people

All consistently justified our service delivery model, so you can see how we generated much excitement and interest from the conference delegates; including IPBIS, the international organisers of the conference. It transpired that we are building on well-established international best practice for paediatric neuro-rehabilitation, as well as addressing some of the key issues that are arising as a result.


"Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation cannot be delivered in isolation. The needs of the child have to be looked at both holistically and within the context of the family unit. Parents need to be empowered to be parents in post-acute pediatric neuro-rehabilitation following brain injury"
The Children's Trust; United Kingdom
"Thousands of children and young people living in the UK today without the help and support that can make a huge difference to their lives"
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Different 'experts' involved in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland
"Healthy teens are better at identifying strategies to deal with barriers. KIDS WITH ABI'S CAN'T!"
Shari Wade; USA
"Brain development is complex and prolonged. Brain plasticity is influenced by a range of factors. Plasticity provides a base for neuro-rehab therapies and treatment"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Families and professionals spend time focusing on the negative aspects of ABI. Families need to be properly supported as 'resilience' is key to delivering successful outcomes for children and young people."
Roberta De Pompeii; USA
"We need to harness the power of brain plasticity for treating children and young people with brain injury. Stressful experiences alter brain development of a child, especially at the key ages of 0-3 and at ages 10-16"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"Restoration of anatomical functions and relationships must be done within 2 months of brain injury"
Eyzyon Eisentein; Israel
"Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is prove to bring health improvements; improve independence; a decline in the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands

OUR MISSION: To work to remove (health) inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded