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Advocacy and Service Navigation

What is advocacy?

Advocacy services help people – particularly those who are most vulnerable in society – to:
a)  access information and services
b)  be involved in decisions about their lives
c)  explore choices and options
d)  defend and promote their rights and responsibilities
e)  speak out about issues that matter to them
(Source NHS England)

What is an advocate?

An advocacy service is provided by someone who is independent of social services and the NHS, and who isn’t part of your family or one of your friends.

An advocate’s role includes arguing your case when you need them to, and making sure the correct procedures are followed by your health and social care services. (Source NHS England)

Our advocacy service means we are there to represent your wishes without giving any personal opinions and without representing the views of any other organisation.

We can do things like:
a)  help you access information you need
b)  go with you to meetings or interviews in a supportive role
c)  write letters on your behalf or
d)  speak for you in situations where you don’t feel able to speak for yourself.


"Restoration of anatomical functions and relationships must be done within 2 months of brain injury"
Eyzyon Eisentein; Israel
"We are medical practitioners. The real experts are the parents. Over the last 35 years they have taught me everything I know"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"We would like to see earlier identification and support for children with brain injuries to help them succeed in school."
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"Intensive and individualized approaches work. A one-size-fits-all approach doesn't. You have to make it relevant to the child."
Recolo; United Kingdom
"Rehabilitation interventions can lead to positive outcomes for children and their families if delivered in the familiar home environment and applied to everyday situations"
Cerebra; United Kingdom
"Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation cannot be delivered in isolation. The needs of the child have to be looked at both holistically and within the context of the family unit. Parents need to be empowered to be parents in post-acute pediatric neuro-rehabilitation following brain injury"
The Children's Trust; United Kingdom
"There are problems with getting people into neuro-rehab centres. Those most in need are often those most excluded due to a lack of socio-economic resources."
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"Case management for children and young people post acquired brain injury is 'pivotal' to successful outcomes and must be local"
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"NHS clinicians struggle with what intervention to priorities in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation due to limited clinical time and the complexity of needs. Children, clinicians, parents and schools all have different neuro-rehabilitation priorities"
Recolo; United Kingdom

OUR MISSION: To work to remove (health) inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded