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Adjustment Problems

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

A traumatic brain injury is a life changing and stressful event which may result in adjustment problems also knowns as adjustment disorder. An adjustment disorder may interfere with rehabilitation following a brain injury. Symptoms may include depression, anxiety, trouble sleeping or concentrating, poor decision making etc.

There are effective treatments for adjustment disorder including counselling and cognitive behavioural therapy which is a form of talk therapy. It enables you to replace negative thinking and behaviour with healthier thoughts and behaviour. Joining a support group may also assist. Medication may be used for symptoms like trouble sleeping or anxiety, but talk therapy is the main treatment.

A person with an adjustment disorder should also try to:

  • Exercise and eat a healthy diet.
  • Get regular hours of sleep.
  • Maintain a social life including support from friends and family
  • Find ways to reduce stress.
  • Give yourself more time to do the things you need to do.

"We need to harness the power of brain plasticity for treating children and young people with brain injury. Stressful experiences alter brain development of a child, especially at the key ages of 0-3 and at ages 10-16"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Strength-based family intervention after pediatric ABI is essential. Parents need to be equipped with the skills to cope and advocate for the child."
Caron Gan; Canada
"New parenting support intervention showed how parenting style is related to executive dysfunction in children and young people post brain injury. With support parents cope better so the child has a better recovery"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain
"Restoration of anatomical functions and relationships must be done within 2 months of brain injury"
Eyzyon Eisentein; Israel
"Healthy teens are better at identifying strategies to deal with barriers. KIDS WITH ABI'S CAN'T!"
Shari Wade; USA
"When different organisations assess different aspects of a child's neuro-rehabilitation needs, everyone looks at things from a different perspective and highlight needs and conflicting priorities"
Cathy Jonson; Rehab without Walls; United Kingdom.
"When someone has a brain injury, early access to local, specialist rehabilitation is crucial to ensure the maximum recovery and make significant savings to the state in health costs"
Headway; United Kingdom
"Often families don't have the financial capability to access services. We need to rethink how we delivery neuro-rehab services to children and young people"
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is prove to bring health improvements; improve independence; a decline in the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Different 'experts' involved in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland

OUR MISSION: To work to remove (health) inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded