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Mood Change

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

A brain injury may result in post-injury personality changes resulting in outbursts of anger, confusion, and unpredictable behaviour. Moods can change suddenly as a result of impaired

executive function. A brain injury may also disrupt the production and function of neurotransmitters that have a role in mood and thought regulation. A person may also struggle with loss of control over their life, loss of previous abilities, loss of work, difficulties with relationships etc. There is often a great deal of adjustment to deal with following a brain injury. Depression may therefore occur as a result of the consequences of the brain injury. It is important to understand the underlying causes of mood change for them to be dealt with effectively.

It may assist to help to identify new goals and to help to work towards them. Try to provide opportunities for positive experiences by engaging in activities the person enjoys. Try to maintain social contact with supportive friends and family. Try to exercise and spend time outdoors. Try to work on focussing on remaining strengths and abilities rather than what has been lost. A rehabilitation psychologist or neuropsychologist may help to develop other strategies to achieve these goals.

It may be necessary for a G.P. to prescribe medication to assist with depression or post-traumatic stress, although the mechanism of brain injury usually means that the person suffering a brain injury has no recollection of the events surrounding the injury.


"Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is prove to bring health improvements; improve independence; a decline in the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Strength-based family intervention after pediatric ABI is essential. Parents need to be equipped with the skills to cope and advocate for the child."
Caron Gan; Canada
"Different 'experts' involved in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland
"Parent-supported interventions following pediatric ABI bring reductions to the cost to society"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Healthy teens are better at identifying strategies to deal with barriers. KIDS WITH ABI'S CAN'T!"
Shari Wade; USA
"Brain development is complex and prolonged. Brain plasticity is influenced by a range of factors. Plasticity provides a base for neuro-rehab therapies and treatment"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"New parenting support intervention showed how parenting style is related to executive dysfunction in children and young people post brain injury. With support parents cope better so the child has a better recovery"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain
"We would like to see earlier identification and support for children with brain injuries to help them succeed in school."
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"Children and young people have poor social competence post brain injury due to reduced cognition, executive functions, and emotional control. As a result they are twice as likely to have mental health issues in the future"
James Tonks; University of London

OUR MISSION: To work to remove (health) inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded