Mood Change

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

A brain injury may result in post-injury personality changes resulting in outbursts of anger, confusion, and unpredictable behaviour. Moods can change suddenly as a result of impaired

executive function. A brain injury may also disrupt the production and function of neurotransmitters that have a role in mood and thought regulation. A person may also struggle with loss of control over their life, loss of previous abilities, loss of work, difficulties with relationships etc. There is often a great deal of adjustment to deal with following a brain injury. Depression may therefore occur as a result of the consequences of the brain injury. It is important to understand the underlying causes of mood change for them to be dealt with effectively.

It may assist to help to identify new goals and to help to work towards them. Try to provide opportunities for positive experiences by engaging in activities the person enjoys. Try to maintain social contact with supportive friends and family. Try to exercise and spend time outdoors. Try to work on focussing on remaining strengths and abilities rather than what has been lost. A rehabilitation psychologist or neuropsychologist may help to develop other strategies to achieve these goals.

It may be necessary for a G.P. to prescribe medication to assist with depression or post-traumatic stress, although the mechanism of brain injury usually means that the person suffering a brain injury has no recollection of the events surrounding the injury.


"Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation cannot be delivered in isolation. The needs of the child have to be looked at both holistically and within the context of the family unit. Parents need to be empowered to be parents in post-acute pediatric neuro-rehabilitation following brain injury"
The Children's Trust; United Kingdom
"Often families don't have the financial capability to access services. We need to rethink how we deliver neuro-rehab services to children and young people"
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"New parenting support intervention showed how parenting style is related to executive dysfunction in children and young people post brain injury. With support parents cope better so the child has a better recovery"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain
"There are problems with getting people into neuro-rehab centres. Those most in need are often those most excluded due to a lack of socio-economic resources."
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"Different 'experts' involved in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland
"More play increases brain plasticity and makes for better recovery post brain injury"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Restoration of anatomical functions and relationships must be done within 2 months of brain injury"
Eyzyon Eisentein; Israel
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"Rehabilitation interventions can lead to positive outcomes for children and their families if delivered in the familiar home environment and applied to everyday situations"
Cerebra; United Kingdom
"Case management for children and young people post acquired brain injury is 'pivotal' to successful outcomes and must be local"
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Charity Excellence Lottery Funded