Mood Change

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

A brain injury may result in post-injury personality changes resulting in outbursts of anger, confusion, and unpredictable behaviour. Moods can change suddenly as a result of impaired

executive function. A brain injury may also disrupt the production and function of neurotransmitters that have a role in mood and thought regulation. A person may also struggle with loss of control over their life, loss of previous abilities, loss of work, difficulties with relationships etc. There is often a great deal of adjustment to deal with following a brain injury. Depression may therefore occur as a result of the consequences of the brain injury. It is important to understand the underlying causes of mood change for them to be dealt with effectively.

It may assist to help to identify new goals and to help to work towards them. Try to provide opportunities for positive experiences by engaging in activities the person enjoys. Try to maintain social contact with supportive friends and family. Try to exercise and spend time outdoors. Try to work on focussing on remaining strengths and abilities rather than what has been lost. A rehabilitation psychologist or neuropsychologist may help to develop other strategies to achieve these goals.

It may be necessary for a G.P. to prescribe medication to assist with depression or post-traumatic stress, although the mechanism of brain injury usually means that the person suffering a brain injury has no recollection of the events surrounding the injury.


"When someone has a brain injury, early access to local, specialist rehabilitation is crucial to ensure the maximum recovery and make significant savings to the state in health costs"
Headway; United Kingdom
"Thousands of children and young people living in the UK today without the help and support that can make a huge difference to their lives"
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation cannot be delivered in isolation. The needs of the child have to be looked at both holistically and within the context of the family unit. Parents need to be empowered to be parents in post-acute pediatric neuro-rehabilitation following brain injury"
The Children's Trust; United Kingdom
"When different organisations assess different aspects of a child's neuro-rehabilitation needs, everyone looks at things from a different perspective and have conflicting priorities"
Cathy Jonson; Rehab without Walls; United Kingdom.
"Different 'experts' involved in paediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland
"Brain development is complex and prolonged. Brain plasticity is influenced by a range of factors. Plasticity provides a base for neuro-rehab therapies and treatment"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Our 10 year study proves that family-led home-based neuro-rehab interventions deliver the best outcomes for children and young people"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"More play increases brain plasticity and makes for better recovery post brain injury"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"NHS clinicians struggle with what intervention to prioritise in paediatric neuro-rehabilitation due to limited clinical time and the complexity of needs. Children, clinicians, parents and schools all have different neuro-rehabilitation priorities"
Recolo; United Kingdom
"Often families don't have the financial capability to access services. We need to rethink how we deliver neuro-rehab services to children and young people"
Vicki Anderson; Australia

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Community Funded Charity Excellence Lottery Funded Youth Foundation BBC CiN