Mood Change

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

A brain injury may result in post-injury personality changes resulting in outbursts of anger, confusion, and unpredictable behaviour. Moods can change suddenly as a result of impaired

executive function. A brain injury may also disrupt the production and function of neurotransmitters that have a role in mood and thought regulation. A person may also struggle with loss of control over their life, loss of previous abilities, loss of work, difficulties with relationships etc. There is often a great deal of adjustment to deal with following a brain injury. Depression may therefore occur as a result of the consequences of the brain injury. It is important to understand the underlying causes of mood change for them to be dealt with effectively.

It may assist to help to identify new goals and to help to work towards them. Try to provide opportunities for positive experiences by engaging in activities the person enjoys. Try to maintain social contact with supportive friends and family. Try to exercise and spend time outdoors. Try to work on focussing on remaining strengths and abilities rather than what has been lost. A rehabilitation psychologist or neuropsychologist may help to develop other strategies to achieve these goals.

It may be necessary for a G.P. to prescribe medication to assist with depression or post-traumatic stress, although the mechanism of brain injury usually means that the person suffering a brain injury has no recollection of the events surrounding the injury.


"We need to harness the power of brain plasticity for treating children and young people with brain injury, especially at the key ages of 0-3 and at ages 10-16"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Healthy teens are better at identifying strategies to deal with barriers. KIDS WITH ABI'S CAN'T!"
Shari Wade; USA
This is the best support plan we have ever seen that will deliver the best outcomes for this young person.  The costings are 'spot on' and realistic'.  Direct Payments Team.  
"Case management for children and young people post acquired brain injury is 'pivotal' to successful outcomes and must be local"
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
Child 1 - Aged 14 and 3 years after a traumatic brain injury
2019 2020 Change
REASONING 301/800 426/800   +  125
MEMORY 181/800 304/800   +  123
ATTENTION 463/800 573/800   +  110
COORDINATION 47/800 309/800   +  262
PERCEPTION 158/800 374/800   +  216
"Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is proven to bring health improvements; improve independence; reduces the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Too often children and young people with ABI are discharged from hospital without specialist brain support that they and their families need to overcome lifelong challenges"
Andrew Ross; former Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"My colleague was blown away by the tremendous work your organisation is doing for society."  Social Worker
"When someone has a brain injury, early access to local, specialist rehabilitation is crucial to ensure the maximum recovery and make significant savings to the state in health costs"
Headway; United Kingdom
"With support parents cope better so the child has a better recovery"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Community Funded Charity Excellence Lottery Funded Youth Foundation BBC CiN