Poor Initiation

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

Poor initiation is a possible consequence of brain injury. The person may have difficulty starting things unless prompted or assisted by others. They may be aware that something needs to be done but do not make a start on it. This can be frustrating for others.

The use of structure and routine assists with initiation of tasks. Following a predictable and known routine together with the breaking down of activities into manageable steps assists a person with a brain injury to be able to start to initiate tasks for themselves. The use of checklists, reminders in a mobile telephone or planners all help. Start with routines that are familiar and link tasks that would occur together or in consequence of the preceding task.

Again, this is something that can improve in time.


"When someone has a brain injury, early access to local, specialist rehabilitation is crucial to ensure the maximum recovery and make significant savings to the state in health costs"
Headway; United Kingdom
"Different 'experts' involved in paediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland
"More play increases brain plasticity and makes for better recovery post brain injury"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"There are problems with getting people into neuro-rehab. Those most in need are often those most excluded due to a lack of socio-economic resources."
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"Families need to be properly supported as 'resilience' is key to delivering successful outcomes for children and young people."
Roberta De Pompeii; USA
"NHS clinicians struggle with what intervention to prioritise in paediatric neuro-rehabilitation due to limited clinical time and the complexity of needs. Children, clinicians, parents and schools all have different neuro-rehabilitation priorities"
Recolo; United Kingdom
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"Taking brain injured children home causes high stress for families. Disjointed services exacerbate family stress levels."
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"Our 10 year study proves that family-led home-based neuro-rehab interventions deliver the best outcomes for children and young people"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"Too often children and young people with ABI are discharged from hospital without specialist brain support that they and their families need to overcome lifelong challenges"
Andrew Ross; former Chief Executive of the Children's Trust

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Community Funded Charity Excellence Lottery Funded Youth Foundation BBC CiN