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Pyschosis

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

Psychosis is a relatively rare result of a traumatic or acquired brain injury. The psychosis may present as delusions, paranoia, delusions of persecution, auditory hallucinations or visual hallucinations.

Hallucinations are a misperception of stimuli that may or may not exist and manifest as seeing objects or lights and possibly hearing voices or other sounds. Delusions are a misperception of the state or circumstances surrounding an individual. Delusions differ from hallucinations in that delusions are not related to the senses.

The most telling symptom of psychosis is called “lack of insight.” People suffering from the symptoms of psychosis are not aware that they are behaving in an unusual manner. No matter how outrageous the hallucinations or delusions may be, the person does not see them as unrealistic in any way. Not everyone with psychosis has the lack of insight. Also, the level and length of the lack of insight can vary in each individual.

Psychosis may present some time after the head injury. It may be debatable as to whether the head injury resulted in the psychosis, or whether there was a predisposition to psychosis prior to and independent of any injury.

Psychosis is an illness which also occurs in people who do not have a brain injury and can be treated by anti-psychotic medication. There is a range of variability in the course of the disorder and its treatment. The symptoms may be resolved relatively quickly or be more chronic. Chronic conditions following brain injury may possibly be associated with a schizoid personality before the brain injury occurred.

If symptoms do not resolve, anti-psychotic medication may be used. Anticonvulsant, antidepressant or other drugs may also be needed in some cases. The type of anti-psychotic or other medication selected will need to take into account possible side effects for the brain injured person. For example, medication with a sedating effect may interfere with and slow cognitive rehabilitation.


"Parent-supported interventions following pediatric ABI bring reductions to the cost to society"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"More play increases brain plasticity and makes for better recovery post brain injury"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"Restoration of anatomical functions and relationships must be done within 2 months of brain injury"
Eyzyon Eisentein; Israel
"NHS clinicians struggle with what intervention to priorities in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation due to limited clinical time and the complexity of needs. Children, clinicians, parents and schools all have different neuro-rehabilitation priorities"
Recolo; United Kingdom
"Often families don't have the financial capability to access services. We need to rethink how we delivery neuro-rehab services to children and young people"
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"We need to harness the power of brain plasticity for treating children and young people with brain injury. Stressful experiences alter brain development of a child, especially at the key ages of 0-3 and at ages 10-16"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Too often children and young people with ABI are discharged from hospital without specialist brain support that they and their families need to overcome lifelong challenges"
Andrew Ross; former Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Children and young people have poor social competence post brain injury due to reduced cognition, executive functions, and emotional control. As a result they are twice as likely to have mental health issues in the future"
James Tonks; University of London
"Our 10 year study proves that family-led home-based neuro-rehab interventions deliver the best outcomes for children and young people"
Lucia Braga; Brazil

OUR MISSION: To work to remove (health) inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded