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General

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

Cognition is the mental action or process of acquiring knowledge and understanding through thought, experience, and the senses. It includes processes such as knowledge, attention, memory and working memory, judgment and evaluationdecision making, comprehension and production of language.

Human cognition is both conscious and unconscious, concrete or abstract, as well as intuitive and conceptual. Cognitive processes involve the use of existing knowledge and the generation of new knowledge.

Unlike physical complaints, which are easily diagnosed, cognitive impairments can be very subtle. This is especially true with higher-level cognitive abilities which are referred to as executive functioning. The primary components of executive functioning are:

  • Analysing
  • Prioritizing
  • Planning
  • Sequencing
  • Organizing
  • Directing
  • Multi-tasking
  • Monitoring
  • Reasoning
  • Evaluating
  • Troubleshooting
  • Problem-solving

The most debilitating cognitive complaint is a lack of awareness of one’s deficits. Without this realization, the person sees no reason to work hard to recover their cognitive abilities and, therefore remain seriously impaired. They may be unable to understand why their life has become so difficult.

Problems in cognition may not be recognised until a person returns home or to education or work. During rehabilitation, cognitive abilities can improve dramatically.


"Strength-based family intervention after pediatric ABI is essential. Parents need to be equipped with the skills to cope and advocate for the child."
Caron Gan; Canada
"Thousands of children and young people living in the UK today without the help and support that can make a huge difference to their lives"
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"When different organisations assess different aspects of a child's neuro-rehabilitation needs, everyone looks at things from a different perspective and highlight needs and conflicting priorities"
Cathy Jonson; Rehab without Walls; United Kingdom.
"We would like to see earlier identification and support for children with brain injuries to help them succeed in school."
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is prove to bring health improvements; improve independence; a decline in the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Restoration of anatomical functions and relationships must be done within 2 months of brain injury"
Eyzyon Eisentein; Israel
"We are medical practitioners. The real experts are the parents. Over the last 35 years they have taught me everything I know"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"Our 10 year study proves that family-led home-based neuro-rehab interventions deliver the best outcomes for children and young people"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"New parenting support intervention showed how parenting style is related to executive dysfunction in children and young people post brain injury. With support parents cope better so the child has a better recovery"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain
"NHS clinicians struggle with what intervention to priorities in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation due to limited clinical time and the complexity of needs. Children, clinicians, parents and schools all have different neuro-rehabilitation priorities"
Recolo; United Kingdom

OUR MISSION: To work to remove (health) inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded