Insight

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

Insight is the awareness of yourself and others. As a result of a brain injury, a person may not be aware of the effect their behaviour may have on others, and consequently do not understand the need to change or modify their behaviour.

Following a brain injury, some people may understand their physical problems but have a limited understanding of their cognitive problems. They may have an awareness of their difficulties but be unable to understand how they then impact on them in their daily life.

People with a brain injury may understanding that they are not the person they used to be, but at the same time do not ‘feel’ any different. They may experience difficulties but not understand that their lack of insight into their behaviour may be exacerbating their problems.

Insight does usually develop over time but some people may never fully regain their awareness of their self and others. They may continue to struggle with social and professional situations and have poor interpersonal and social skills.

Non critical feedback from family, friends and colleagues can assist a person with a brain injury to gain some insight into their behaviour and its effects on others.


"Parent-supported interventions after pediatric ABI bring reductions to the cost to society"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Too often children and young people with ABI are discharged from hospital without specialist brain support that they and their families need to overcome lifelong challenges"
Andrew Ross; former Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Poor parenting styles affects children's behavior; increases their learning disability; and has a negative impact on emotions; anxiety; anger management post brain injury"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain
"When different organisations assess different aspects of a child's neuro-rehabilitation needs, everyone looks at things from a different perspective and highlight needs and conflicting priorities"
Cathy Jonson; Rehab without Walls; United Kingdom.
"Taking brain injured children home causes high stress for families. Disjointed services exacerbate family stress levels."
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation cannot be delivered in isolation. The needs of the child have to be looked at both holistically and within the context of the family unit. Parents need to be empowered to be parents in post-acute pediatric neuro-rehabilitation following brain injury"
The Children's Trust; United Kingdom
"Families and professionals spend time focusing on the negative aspects of ABI. Families need to be properly supported as 'resilience' is key to delivering successful outcomes for children and young people."
Roberta De Pompeii; USA
"Brain development is complex and prolonged. Brain plasticity is influenced by a range of factors. Plasticity provides a base for neuro-rehab therapies and treatment"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Different 'experts' involved in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland
"More play increases brain plasticity and makes for better recovery post brain injury"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Community Funded Charity Excellence Lottery Funded