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Insight

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

Insight is the awareness of yourself and others. As a result of a brain injury, a person may not be aware of the effect their behaviour may have on others, and consequently do not understand the need to change or modify their behaviour.

Following a brain injury, some people may understand their physical problems but have a limited understanding of their cognitive problems. They may have an awareness of their difficulties but be unable to understand how they then impact on them in their daily life.

People with a brain injury may understanding that they are not the person they used to be, but at the same time do not ‘feel’ any different. They may experience difficulties but not understand that their lack of insight into their behaviour may be exacerbating their problems.

Insight does usually develop over time but some people may never fully regain their awareness of their self and others. They may continue to struggle with social and professional situations and have poor interpersonal and social skills.

Non critical feedback from family, friends and colleagues can assist a person with a brain injury to gain some insight into their behaviour and its effects on others.


"New parenting support intervention showed how parenting style is related to executive dysfunction in children and young people post brain injury. With support parents cope better so the child has a better recovery"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain
"Brain development is complex and prolonged. Brain plasticity is influenced by a range of factors. Plasticity provides a base for neuro-rehab therapies and treatment"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"More play increases brain plasticity and makes for better recovery post brain injury"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Intensive and individualized approaches work. A one-size-fits-all approach doesn't. You have to make it relevant to the child."
Recolo; United Kingdom
"We need to harness the power of brain plasticity for treating children and young people with brain injury. Stressful experiences alter brain development of a child, especially at the key ages of 0-3 and at ages 10-16"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"Different 'experts' involved in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland
"We are medical practitioners. The real experts are the parents. Over the last 35 years they have taught me everything I know"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"There are problems with getting people into neuro-rehab centres. Those most in need are often those most excluded due to a lack of socio-economic resources."
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"Families and professionals spend time focusing on the negative aspects of ABI. Families need to be properly supported as 'resilience' is key to delivering successful outcomes for children and young people."
Roberta De Pompeii; USA

OUR MISSION: To work to remove (health) inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded