Memory

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

Memory is almost always affected by a brain injury. The brain may struggle to take in, store, process or find information. There are four types of memory which can be affected, either individually or in combination. The different types of memory are:

  1. Short-term memory – the ability to hold a small amount of information for about twenty seconds
  2. Long-term memory – the ability to hold and retrieve information for as little as a few days and as long as a few decades
  3. Retrograde memory – the ability to recall events that occurred prior to the injury
  4. Anterograde memory – the ability to recall events that occurred after the injury

Short term memory is more commonly affected by brain injury. Some people may be unable to remember faces or names, or what they have read, or what has been said to them. New learning may be affected, while previously learned skills may still be intact. This is because the damaged brain is now unable to organise and remember new material. Fatigue and sleep problems, poor health, medications, stress, and strong emotions can all acerbate ongoing memory problems.
Memory problems can be aided by using reminders, setting a routine, use of memory strategies, organisation, breaking information down, using daily planners or to do lists, taking notes and use of technology such as electronic organisers.


"Healthy teens are better at identifying strategies to deal with barriers. KIDS WITH ABI'S CAN'T!"
Shari Wade; USA
"Parent-supported interventions after paediatric ABI bring reductions to the cost to society"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is proven to bring health improvements; improve independence; reduces the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"We need to harness the power of brain plasticity for treating children and young people with brain injury, especially at the key ages of 0-3 and at ages 10-16"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"We are medical practitioners. The real experts are the parents. Over the last 35 years they have taught me everything I know"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"My colleague was blown away by the tremendous work your organisation is doing for society."  Social Worker
"Often families don't have the financial capability to access services. We need to rethink how we deliver neuro-rehab services to children and young people"
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"Intensive and individualized approaches work. A one-size-fits-all approach doesn't. You have to make it relevant to the child."
Recolo; United Kingdom
"There are problems with getting people into neuro-rehab. Those most in need are often those most excluded due to a lack of socio-economic resources."
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"We are impressed with the progress you have made with the individual we referred to you."  Social Worker    

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Community Funded Charity Excellence Lottery Funded Youth Foundation BBC CiN