Memory

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

Memory is almost always affected by a brain injury. The brain may struggle to take in, store, process or find information. There are four types of memory which can be affected, either individually or in combination. The different types of memory are:

  1. Short-term memory – the ability to hold a small amount of information for about twenty seconds
  2. Long-term memory – the ability to hold and retrieve information for as little as a few days and as long as a few decades
  3. Retrograde memory – the ability to recall events that occurred prior to the injury
  4. Anterograde memory – the ability to recall events that occurred after the injury

Short term memory is more commonly affected by brain injury. Some people may be unable to remember faces or names, or what they have read, or what has been said to them. New learning may be affected, while previously learned skills may still be intact. This is because the damaged brain is now unable to organise and remember new material. Fatigue and sleep problems, poor health, medications, stress, and strong emotions can all acerbate ongoing memory problems.
Memory problems can be aided by using reminders, setting a routine, use of memory strategies, organisation, breaking information down, using daily planners or to do lists, taking notes and use of technology such as electronic organisers.


"Intensive and individualized approaches work. A one-size-fits-all approach doesn't. You have to make it relevant to the child."
Recolo; United Kingdom
"Families need to be properly supported as 'resilience' is key to delivering successful outcomes for children and young people."
Roberta De Pompeii; USA
"Too often children and young people with ABI are discharged from hospital without specialist brain support that they and their families need to overcome lifelong challenges"
Andrew Ross; former Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is proven to bring health improvements; improve independence; reduces the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"There are problems with getting people into neuro-rehab. Those most in need are often those most excluded due to a lack of socio-economic resources."
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"Parent-supported interventions after paediatric ABI bring reductions to the cost to society"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"We would like to see earlier identification and support for children with brain injuries to help them succeed in school."
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Thousands of children and young people living in the UK today without the help and support that can make a huge difference to their lives"
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"Strength-based family intervention after pediatric ABI is essential. Parents need to be equipped with the skills to cope and advocate for the child."
Caron Gan; Canada
"Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation cannot be delivered in isolation. The needs of the child have to be looked at both holistically and within the context of the family unit. Parents need to be empowered to be parents in post-acute pediatric neuro-rehabilitation following brain injury"
The Children's Trust; United Kingdom

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Community Funded Charity Excellence Lottery Funded Youth Foundation BBC CiN