Problem Solving

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

The term “problem solving” is used to describe how we deal with everyday difficulties. When we problem solve we apply a set of rules to everyday problems to solve them quickly and successfully. After brain injury, problems often seem to pile up and people may feel so overwhelmed that they may give up trying to solve their problems.

Persons with a brain injury or their families may get conflicting advice from other family members, friends, and professionals making it even more difficult to decide what steps to take. Survivors and families often find that resources are limited after brain injury. Money is a problem for those who stop working. Support from friends and outside family members may also be hard to find.

Signs that someone may have difficulty with problem solving are:

  • Individuals with TBI may not recognize there is a problem, which is the first step in problem-solving.
  • They may have trouble analysing information or being flexible in the way they think.
  • They may have difficulty deciding the best solution, or get stuck on one solution and not consider other, better options.
  • They may make quick decisions without thinking about the consequences, or not use the best judgment.

Strategies for problem solving:

  • A speech therapist or psychologist experienced in cognitive rehabilitation can teach an organized approach for daily problem-solving.
  • Work through a step-by-step problem-solving strategy in writing
  • Define the problem
  • List possible solutions
  • List the pros and cons of each solution
  • Pick a solution to try
  • Evaluate the success of the solution
  • Try another solution if the first one doesn’t work.

"My colleague was blown away by the tremendous work your organisation is doing for society."  Social Worker
"With support parents cope better so the child has a better recovery"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain
"Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation cannot be delivered in isolation. The needs of the child have to be looked at both holistically and within the context of the family unit. Parents need to be empowered to be parents in post-acute pediatric neuro-rehabilitation following brain injury"
The Children's Trust; United Kingdom
"Strength-based family intervention after pediatric ABI is essential. Parents need to be equipped with the skills to cope and advocate for the child."
Caron Gan; Canada
"Taking brain injured children home causes high stress for families. Disjointed services exacerbate family stress levels."
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"Children and young people have poor social competence post brain injury due to reduced cognition, executive functions, and emotional control. As a result they are twice as likely to have mental health issues in the future"
James Tonks; University of London
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"Often families don't have the financial capability to access services. We need to rethink how we deliver neuro-rehab services to children and young people"
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"Healthy teens are better at identifying strategies to deal with barriers. KIDS WITH ABI'S CAN'T!"
Shari Wade; USA
This is the best support plan we have ever seen that will deliver the best outcomes for this young person.  The costings are 'spot on' and realistic'.  Direct Payments Team.  

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

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