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Social Judgement

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

Acquired brain injury may affect social judgement as a result of disinhibition or an inability to be able to read social clues. Disinhibition is a lack of restraint which is shown as disregard for social conventions, impulsivity, and poor risk assessment.

Disinhibited behaviour occurs when people no longer follow the social rules about what or where to say or do something. They may present as rude, tactless or even offensive. A person with a brain injury may make a comment without realising its impact on others or make a joke that is inappropriate in the context.

A person with a brain injury may enter another person’s ‘personal space’ without being aware that it is uncomfortable for them. They may not understand the ‘rules of conversation’ and talk without letting the other person speak, over-talk another person, or have difficulty staying ‘on topic’ which can be frustrating for others.

People with impaired social judgement may have other more problematic behaviours, such as verbal or physical aggression, socially inappropriate behaviour, sexual disinhibition, wandering, and repetitive behaviour.

With support and rehabilitation, social problems do improve for people with acquired brain injury but it is necessary for them to understand that there is an issue and be prepared to work on it.


"Case management for children and young people post acquired brain injury is 'pivotal' to successful outcomes and must be local"
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is prove to bring health improvements; improve independence; a decline in the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"Children and young people have poor social competence post brain injury due to reduced cognition, executive functions, and emotional control. As a result they are twice as likely to have mental health issues in the future"
James Tonks; University of London
"Parent-supported interventions following pediatric ABI bring reductions to the cost to society"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Healthy teens are better at identifying strategies to deal with barriers. KIDS WITH ABI'S CAN'T!"
Shari Wade; USA
"Different 'experts' involved in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland
"Poor parenting styles affects children's behavior; increased their learning disability; and had a negative impact on emotions; anxiety; anger management post brain injury"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain
"We need to harness the power of brain plasticity for treating children and young people with brain injury. Stressful experiences alter brain development of a child, especially at the key ages of 0-3 and at ages 10-16"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Families and professionals spend time focusing on the negative aspects of ABI. Families need to be properly supported as 'resilience' is key to delivering successful outcomes for children and young people."
Roberta De Pompeii; USA

OUR MISSION: To work to remove (health) inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded