Dysgraphia

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

Dysgraphia affects written expression. Dysgraphia can appear as difficulties with spelling, poor handwriting and trouble putting thoughts on paper. Many people have poor handwriting, but dysgraphia is more serious.

Writing requires a complex set of motor and information processing skills. Not only does it require the ability to organize and express ideas in the mind. It also requires the ability to get the muscles in the hands and fingers to form those ideas, letter by letter, on paper.

Signs of Dysgraphia:

  • Generally illegible writing
  • Inconsistencies in writing, e.g. mixtures of printing and cursive writing, upper and lower case, or irregular sizes, shapes, or slant of letters
  • Unfinished words or letters, omitted words
  • Inconsistent position of letters on the page with respect to lines and margins
  • Inconsistent spaces between words and letters
  • Cramped or unusual grip of the writing instrument
  • Talking to self-whilst writing, or carefully watching the hand that is writing
  • Slow or laboured copying or writing
  • Large gap between written ideas and understanding demonstrated through speech.
  • Difficulty organising thoughts on paper

Educational psychologists use a series of tests to determine if a person has language based dysgraphia. Occupational Therapists can identify problems with mechanical based dysgraphia or apraxia. There are many ways to help a person with dysgraphia achieve success. A person with dysgraphia will benefit from help from both specialists and those who are closest to the person.


"Parent-supported interventions after pediatric ABI bring reductions to the cost to society"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"When someone has a brain injury, early access to local, specialist rehabilitation is crucial to ensure the maximum recovery and make significant savings to the state in health costs"
Headway; United Kingdom
"We are medical practitioners. The real experts are the parents. Over the last 35 years they have taught me everything I know"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"When different organisations assess different aspects of a child's neuro-rehabilitation needs, everyone looks at things from a different perspective and highlight needs and conflicting priorities"
Cathy Jonson; Rehab without Walls; United Kingdom.
"Our 10 year study proves that family-led home-based neuro-rehab interventions deliver the best outcomes for children and young people"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"Restoration of anatomical functions and relationships must be done within 2 months of brain injury"
Eyzyon Eisentein; Israel
"Children and young people have poor social competence post brain injury due to reduced cognition, executive functions, and emotional control. As a result they are twice as likely to have mental health issues in the future"
James Tonks; University of London
"Case management for children and young people post acquired brain injury is 'pivotal' to successful outcomes and must be local"
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"Too often children and young people with ABI are discharged from hospital without specialist brain support that they and their families need to overcome lifelong challenges"
Andrew Ross; former Chief Executive of the Children's Trust

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

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