Disinhibition

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

A person with disinhibition is likely to do or say things without considering the consequences and impacts of their actions. Normally, we have a ‘filter’ which allows us to understand these potential consequences. Following brain injury a person may become disinhibited and may do and say things most of us would steer away from. For example they may blurt out what comes to mind, share private information, pass insulting comments, not following social rules such as swearing in front of others, being sexually disinhibited, and not being able to control other urges such as intake of alcohol.

This can be upsetting for family and friends and also a potential source of conflict with others which is potentially dangerous for the individual. It can be very difficult to control because of the persons lack of self-awareness. Most people can and do re-learn socially-appropriate ways of behaving, though some, may continue to make inappropriate remarks or be over-familiar.


Child 1 - Aged 14 and 3 years after a traumatic brain injury
2019 2020 Change
REASONING 301/800 426/800   +  125
MEMORY 181/800 304/800   +  123
ATTENTION 463/800 573/800   +  110
COORDINATION 47/800 309/800   +  262
PERCEPTION 158/800 374/800   +  216
"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"My colleague was blown away by the tremendous work your organisation is doing for society."  Social Worker
"Thousands of children and young people living in the UK today without the help and support that can make a huge difference to their lives"
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"When someone has a brain injury, early access to local, specialist rehabilitation is crucial to ensure the maximum recovery and make significant savings to the state in health costs"
Headway; United Kingdom
"Case management for children and young people post acquired brain injury is 'pivotal' to successful outcomes and must be local"
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"Intensive and individualized approaches work. A one-size-fits-all approach doesn't. You have to make it relevant to the child."
Recolo; United Kingdom
"Our 10 year study proves that family-led home-based neuro-rehab interventions deliver the best outcomes for children and young people"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"There are problems with getting people into neuro-rehab. Those most in need are often those most excluded due to a lack of socio-economic resources."
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is proven to bring health improvements; improve independence; reduces the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Community Funded Charity Excellence Lottery Funded Youth Foundation BBC CiN