NHS Statistics

300,000 children attend A & E in the UK with a head injury per year

How many children are affected by a traumatic brain injury?

  • 35,000 children are admitted to hospital for a traumatic brain injury per year.  Of these:
  • 30,000 will have a mild brain injury
  • 3,000 will have a moderate brain injury and
  • 2,000 will have a severe brain injury

How many children suffer an atraumatic brain injury each year (i.e. not caused by trauma) but also needing hospital admission?

  • An estimated 30 / 100 children every year across the UK.  Causes:
  • Non traumatic coma (eg cardiac arrest, encephalitis, metabolic disorder)
  • Brain tumours – 500 per year
  • Stroke – 200/300 per year

(Source Dr M O’Sullivan, Paediatric Consultant, James Cook University Hospital, October 2015)

Outcome of paediatric acquired brain injury

Research shows that the younger the child at the time of the injury, the greater the possibility of long term difficulties because:

  • injury to a developing brain, that has not yet established skills and functions, creates increased complexity for treatment and far reaching effects
  • cognitive impairment may only become apparent in teenage years
  • brain injuries are very variable
  • recovery after a traumatic brain injury is often patchy

Common problems after a brain injury show in four areas:

  • physical
  • communicative
  • cognitive and
  • behavioural/emotional

Click below to see the full range of potential problems experienced by children who have experienced a brain injury.

KNOWN DEFICITS OF ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY


"Families and professionals spend time focusing on the negative aspects of ABI. Families need to be properly supported as 'resilience' is key to delivering successful outcomes for children and young people."
Roberta De Pompeii; USA
"Different 'experts' involved in pediatric neuro-rehabilitation come from different organisational cultures which causes conflict and has a negative effect on the outcomes for the child."
Barbara O'Connell; Ireland
"Parent-supported interventions after pediatric ABI bring reductions to the cost to society"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Healthy teens are better at identifying strategies to deal with barriers. KIDS WITH ABI'S CAN'T!"
Shari Wade; USA
"Often families don't have the financial capability to access services. We need to rethink how we deliver neuro-rehab services to children and young people"
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"Taking brain injured children home causes high stress for families. Disjointed services exacerbate family stress levels."
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"Case management for children and young people post acquired brain injury is 'pivotal' to successful outcomes and must be local"
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"When different organisations assess different aspects of a child's neuro-rehabilitation needs, everyone looks at things from a different perspective and highlight needs and conflicting priorities"
Cathy Jonson; Rehab without Walls; United Kingdom.
"Children and young people have poor social competence post brain injury due to reduced cognition, executive functions, and emotional control. As a result they are twice as likely to have mental health issues in the future"
James Tonks; University of London
"Strength-based family intervention after pediatric ABI is essential. Parents need to be equipped with the skills to cope and advocate for the child."
Caron Gan; Canada

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Charity Excellence Lottery Funded