Font size + -

Statistics

300,000 children attend A & E in the UK with a head injury per year

How many children are affected by a traumatic brain injury?

  • 35,000 children are then admitted to hospital for a traumatic brain injury per year

Of these admissions:

  • 30,000 will have a mild brain injury
  • 3,000 will have a moderate brain injury and
  • 2,000 will have a severe brain injury

Every year 5 to 6 children per 100,000 children need admission to the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)

Regionally children are treated in the 2 north-east paediatric Trauma Centres:

  • James Cook University Hospital which admits an average of 11 per year
  • Great North Children’s Hospital (previously known as the Newcastle RVI) which admits an average of 13 per year

How many children suffer an atraumatic brain injury each year (ie not caused by trauma) but also needing hospital admission?

  • An estimated 30 per 100 children every year across the UK
  • Non traumatic coma (eg cardiac arrest, encephalitis, metabolic disorder)
  • Brain tumours – 500 per year
  • Stroke – 200/300 per year

(Source Dr Maeve O’Sullivvan, Paediatric Consultant, James Cook University Hospital, October 2015)

Outcome of paediatric acquired brain injury

Research shows that the younger the child at the time of the injury, the greater the possibility of long term difficulties beause:

  • injury to a developing brain, that has not yet established skills and functions, creates increased complexity for treatment and far reaching effects
  • cognitive impairment may only become apparent in teenage years
  • brain injuries are very variable
  • recovery after a traumatic brain injury is often patchy

Common problems after a brain injury show in four areas:

  • physical
  • communicative
  • cognitive and
  • behavioural/emotional

Click below to see the full range of potential problems experienced by children who have experienced a brain injury.

KNOWN DEFICITS OF ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY


"Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation cannot be delivered in isolation. The needs of the child have to be looked at both holistically and within the context of the family unit. Parents need to be empowered to be parents in post-acute pediatric neuro-rehabilitation following brain injury"
The Children's Trust; United Kingdom
"We need to harness the power of brain plasticity for treating children and young people with brain injury. Stressful experiences alter brain development of a child, especially at the key ages of 0-3 and at ages 10-16"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Case management for children and young people post acquired brain injury is 'pivotal' to successful outcomes and must be local"
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"When different organisations assess different aspects of a child's neuro-rehabilitation needs, everyone looks at things from a different perspective and highlight needs and conflicting priorities"
Cathy Jonson; Rehab without Walls; United Kingdom.
"Too often children and young people with ABI are discharged from hospital without specialist brain support that they and their families need to overcome lifelong challenges"
Andrew Ross; former Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"More play increases brain plasticity and makes for better recovery post brain injury"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Poor parenting styles affects children's behavior; increased their learning disability; and had a negative impact on emotions; anxiety; anger management post brain injury"
Andrea Palacio-Navarro; Spain
"Our 10 year study proves that family-led home-based neuro-rehab interventions deliver the best outcomes for children and young people"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"Children and young people have poor social competence post brain injury due to reduced cognition, executive functions, and emotional control. As a result they are twice as likely to have mental health issues in the future"
James Tonks; University of London
"There are problems with getting people into neuro-rehab centres. Those most in need are often those most excluded due to a lack of socio-economic resources."
Vicki Anderson; Australia

OUR MISSION: To work to remove (health) inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded