Practical Support

The journey towards neurological recovery and the rehabilitation process is often a lengthy and erratic one. No two journeys are the same. Often the process involves a mix of small improvements, significant advances, stalling (plateau-ing) and/or backward steps; which for the family can be difficult to deal with. When combined with the emotional trauma you have already faced, this can cause a huge ripple effect across the family unit. For example you may find you are unable to offer other siblings the help and support that they need; or you may find it difficult to keep up with the housework.

Whilst other family members may help out in the beginning, there often comes a point when this has to end. This often has a negative impact on the psychological and emotional well- being of both parents and other family members. In turn this can affect normal household routines and it can become easy to ‘let things slip’; which then further exacerbates family pressures and stress.

At MATRIX we aim to support families and minimise family stress and tensions. Our volunteer scheme will therefore offer practical help and support around the home to help you keep on top of other day-to-day tasks, should you feel this is necessary. Speak to your family support team to discuss any further needs you may have and how we can help.


I was very impressed with the results you have had with the young people you have worked with.
"We need to harness the power of brain plasticity for treating children and young people with brain injury, especially at the key ages of 0-3 and at ages 10-16"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"We would like to see earlier identification and support for children with brain injuries to help them succeed in school."
Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
"We are medical practitioners. The real experts are the parents. Over the last 35 years they have taught me everything I know"
Lucia Braga; Brazil
"NHS clinicians struggle with what intervention to prioritise in paediatric neuro-rehabilitation due to limited clinical time and the complexity of needs. Children, clinicians, parents and schools all have different neuro-rehabilitation priorities"
Recolo; United Kingdom
Child 1 - Aged 14 and 3 years after a traumatic brain injury
2019 2020 Change
REASONING 301/800 426/800   +  125
MEMORY 181/800 304/800   +  123
ATTENTION 463/800 573/800   +  110
COORDINATION 47/800 309/800   +  262
PERCEPTION 158/800 374/800   +  216
"When someone has a brain injury, early access to local, specialist rehabilitation is crucial to ensure the maximum recovery and make significant savings to the state in health costs"
Headway; United Kingdom
"Healthy teens are better at identifying strategies to deal with barriers. KIDS WITH ABI'S CAN'T!"
Shari Wade; USA
"There are problems with getting people into neuro-rehab. Those most in need are often those most excluded due to a lack of socio-economic resources."
Vicki Anderson; Australia
"Our 10 year study proves that family-led home-based neuro-rehab interventions deliver the best outcomes for children and young people"
Lucia Braga; Brazil

OUR MISSION: To work to remove inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Community Funded Charity Excellence Lottery Funded Youth Foundation BBC CiN