Font size + -

Neuro-rehabilitation

What does neuro-rehabilitation do?
‘Rehabilitation aims to reduce the impact of (brain) injury by restoration of damaged function, or compensation for lost function, within the limitations of underlying disease, to optimise physical, cognitive, psychological and social function.’      (Seeley & Hutchinson, 2006)

What do we know?
From adult studies of traumatic brain  injury:
Better access to neuro-rehabilitation associated with better outcomes means people:

  • are more likely to be discharged home
  • have a shorter hospital stay
  • have better functional outcome which was maintained after period of rehabilitation has ended  *
  • decreases levels of distress of carers  *

* This is is the main focus of our charitable work and where we add value to existing NHS provision.

Additionally, the outcome of a paediatric acquired brain injury is related to family function, economic factors and social support.  Neuro-rehabilitation is therefore not just about physiotherapy, occupational therapy ,speech and language therapy etc.   Children, young people and their families need lots of ongoing support during the neuro-rehabilitation journey; and for long after the usual therapy interventions have ended.

Neuro-rehabilitation is most effective if:

  • It is delivered by a coordinated multi-disciplinary team with an interdisciplinary approach
  • There is goal setting and assessment
  • There is a key worker to communicate and provide advocacy for the child and the family
  • It is individually tailored to need
  • Is seamless
  • It is meaningful and delivered in relevant context
  • An appropriate level of therapy and support is provided
  • Access to suitable educational provision is available
  • Psychological needs are addressed
  • It involves and supports the family
  • Post discharge is where these very vulnerable children are most at risk of not receiving the help and support they need, due to a lack of understanding of their hidden disabilities. Working in partnership with parents and professionals, we coordinate the ongoing needs of brain injured children and young people across a range of community organisations; ensuring their ongoing and often changing needs continue to be met. Without us, this does not happen and the needs of this vulnerable cohort often go unrecognised and unsupported.

     


    "Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation cannot be delivered in isolation. The needs of the child have to be looked at both holistically and within the context of the family unit. Parents need to be empowered to be parents in post-acute pediatric neuro-rehabilitation following brain injury"
    The Children's Trust; United Kingdom
    "Families and professionals spend time focusing on the negative aspects of ABI. Families need to be properly supported as 'resilience' is key to delivering successful outcomes for children and young people."
    Roberta De Pompeii; USA
    "When different organisations assess different aspects of a child's neuro-rehabilitation needs, everyone looks at things from a different perspective and highlight needs and conflicting priorities"
    Cathy Jonson; Rehab without Walls; United Kingdom.
    "Intensive and individualized approaches work. A one-size-fits-all approach doesn't. You have to make it relevant to the child."
    Recolo; United Kingdom
    "Brain development is complex and prolonged. Brain plasticity is influenced by a range of factors. Plasticity provides a base for neuro-rehab therapies and treatment"
    Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
    "We would like to see earlier identification and support for children with brain injuries to help them succeed in school."
    Dalton Leong; Chief Executive of the Children's Trust
    "Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is prove to bring health improvements; improve independence; a decline in the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
    Eric Hermans; Netherlands
    "Strength-based family intervention after pediatric ABI is essential. Parents need to be equipped with the skills to cope and advocate for the child."
    Caron Gan; Canada
    "Parent-supported interventions following pediatric ABI bring reductions to the cost to society"
    Eric Hermans; Netherlands
    "Too often children and young people with ABI are discharged from hospital without specialist brain support that they and their families need to overcome lifelong challenges"
    Andrew Ross; former Chief Executive of the Children's Trust

    OUR MISSION: To work to remove (health) inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

    Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded