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Self Monitoring

Physical Communication Cognitive Behavioural / Emotional

Self-monitoring involves the process of setting goals, planning, monitoring/reviewing, and adjusting accordingly. Normally this process is automatic, however people with a brain injury may lose these abilities. It may have to become a more conscious and deliberate thought process.

As a result of an acquired brain injury there may be specific difficulties in understanding needs, setting realistic goals, making plans to achieve the goals, initiating relevant goal-directed behaviours, inhibiting distracting behaviours, monitoring performance, evaluating the outcomes in relation to goals, and making strategic adjustments as a result of this monitoring process.

Self-monitoring tends to develop in steps from:

  • minimal understanding of what is easy and what is difficult, to
  • increasing understanding that some activities/functions are easy and some are difficult, to
  • recognition that a mistake has been made after it is made, to
  • anticipating difficult activities and doing something in advance to succeed.

Self-monitoring is therefore closely tied to self-awareness of strengths and weaknesses. If a person with a brain injury is not aware of difficulties in a specific domain of functioning, or actively resist acknowledging such difficulties, they are unlikely to effectively monitor their performance in that domain. It may therefore be necessary to use rehabilitation to develop such awareness or overcome resistance.


"Participation in teen sports and normal activities leads to improved quality of life for children and young people post brain injury and helps to maximise outcomes"
Claire Willis; Australia
"Case management for children and young people post acquired brain injury is 'pivotal' to successful outcomes and must be local"
Deborah Andrews; New Zealand
"Rehabilitation interventions can lead to positive outcomes for children and their families if delivered in the familiar home environment and applied to everyday situations"
Cerebra; United Kingdom
"More play increases brain plasticity and makes for better recovery post brain injury"
Professor Bryan Kolb; Canada
"Positive and coordinated neuro-rehab interventions for children and young people is prove to bring health improvements; improve independence; a decline in the need for sheltered living; decreases vulnerability; decreases drop-out rates in schools; decreases youth offending"
Eric Hermans; Netherlands
"Restoration of anatomical functions and relationships must be done within 2 months of brain injury"
Eyzyon Eisentein; Israel
"Children and young people have poor social competence post brain injury due to reduced cognition, executive functions, and emotional control. As a result they are twice as likely to have mental health issues in the future"
James Tonks; University of London
"Strength-based family intervention after pediatric ABI is essential. Parents need to be equipped with the skills to cope and advocate for the child."
Caron Gan; Canada
"When someone has a brain injury, early access to local, specialist rehabilitation is crucial to ensure the maximum recovery and make significant savings to the state in health costs"
Headway; United Kingdom
"When different organisations assess different aspects of a child's neuro-rehabilitation needs, everyone looks at things from a different perspective and highlight needs and conflicting priorities"
Cathy Jonson; Rehab without Walls; United Kingdom.

OUR MISSION: To work to remove (health) inequalities for children & young people affected by acquired brain injury; and provide effective support to their families that makes a real difference.

Council for Disabled Children Lottery Funded